Security Means Managing What You Already Own First

By Eric Noonan • December 11, 2014

A trend that I have picked up on in conversations with CIO’s, CISO’s and other leaders responsible for securing the enterprise is the huge gap between what they need and what many vendors are marketing. Security leaders in the trenches need solutions to optimize and integrate existing tool investments, manage security capabilities in a coordinated way, and a means for engaging in business conversations about the security they deliver. Vendors seem focused on marketing the future and selling more capability into already resource-strapped security teams that can’t even effectively use the tools they already own due to an under-investment in people and process.

Instead of buying more “stuff”  to manage I’d suggest finding a way to measure and manage what you already own. What’s that look like?

Focus on the things you have control over, for example, privileged accounts. Instead of academic discussions around data classification (you know with all the re-organizations and M&A activity you are never going to get there) put your energy into identifying, reducing and then managing your privileged accounts. You own and control your privileged accounts and they are exploited in 100% of the attacks you are most worried about so before you buy that next-generation firewall make sure you’ve taken care of the fundamentals.

Another opportunity to seize today in lieu of investing in the unknown future is vulnerability management. Your effectiveness at vulnerability management has a direct impact on nearly every other part of the security organization you manage. No process for patch management:  expect to spend more on incident response. Scanning only a portion of your environment: expect more alerts for your Security Operations Center team to manage. There is a direct correlation between resources consumed in other areas of security and your investment in vulnerability management. It’s another example of managing what you already own before you try to ingest another tool without adding any engineers or process.

I’m not suggesting that CIO’s and CISO’s shouldn’t be trying to “see around corners” and prepare for the future but the amount of hype about what’s next taking away the focus from managing today.

CyberSheath Blog

Dr. Robert Spalding to Address Nation-State Attacks at CMMC Con 2021

Since the inaugural CMMC Con, we’ve seen some of the most malicious attacks on American infrastructure ever executed. The SolarWinds attack reverberated across the entire government as agencies scrambled to discover what nation-state attackers had accessed and stolen. The Colonial Pipeline, shut down by a ransomware attack, led to fuel…

CMMC-AB vice chair Jeff Dalton to address CMMC Con 2021

The swiftness and severity of recent cyber attacks has dominated headlines and revealed that many organizations still don’t quite know what to do to protect themselves, as well as the businesses and government entities they’re connected to.   Ransomware attacks were a big point of discussion at the recent G7…

CMMC Con 2021 Opens Registration, Reveals Theme and Speakers

CMMC compliance stands in the way of revenue for every defense contractor in the supply chain. Now that CMMC is a reality for the Defense Industrial Base (DIB), learn how contractors — primes and subs, large and small, foreign-owned — are handling the standards and requirements, as well as the…

Our Trusted Partners

Cyberark McAfee Thycotic RSA Tenable Alien Vault Alert Logic Microsoft